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    Kansas State University
   
 
  Oct 17, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 Graduate Catalog

Chemistry


213 Chemistry and Biochemistry Bldg
785-532-6665
Fax: 785-532-6666
chemdept@ksu.edu
http://www.ksu.edu/chem

Department Head:

Daniel A. Higgins

Directors of graduate studies:

Christer B. Aakeröy
Paul E. Smith

Graduate faculty:

*Christer B. Aakeröy, Ph.D., University of Sussex, United Kingdom
*Christine M. Aikens, Ph.D., Iowa State University
*Santosh Aryal, Ph.D., Chonbuk National University
*Stefan Bossmann, Ph.D., University of Saarland, Germany
*Viktor Chikan, Ph.D., Kansas State University
*Christopher T. Culbertson, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Peter Dorhout, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
*Tendai Gadzikwa, Ph.D., Northwestern University
*Daniel A. Higgins, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
*Mark D. Hollingsworth, Ph.D., Yale University
*Duy H. Hua, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
*Takashi Ito, Ph.D., University of Tokyo
*Ryszard Jankowiak, Ph.D., Technical University, Gdansk, Poland
*Jun Li, Ph.D., Princeton University
*Ping Li, Ph.D., Duke University
*Emily McLaurin, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
*Ryan Rafferty, Ph.D., Colorado State University
*Paul E. Smith, Ph.D., University of Liverpool, England
Peter Sues, University of Toronto
Louis M. Wojcinski, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University

Graduate faculty emeriti:

*Robert M. Hammaker, Ph.D., Northwestern University
*M. Dale Hawley, Ph.D., University of Kansas
Robert E. Kruh, Ph.D., Washington University, St. Louis
*Eric A. Maatta, Ph.D., Indiana University
*Clifton E. Meloan, Ph.D., Purdue University
Herbert Charles Moser, Ph.D., Iowa State University
*Donald W. Setser, Ph.D., University of Washington
*Peter Sherwood, Ph.D., Cambridge University

 *Denotes graduate faculty that are certified to serve as the major professor for doctoral students.

Research Facilities

As a medium-sized department, K-State Chemistry is large enough to ensure that our students are provided access to a variety of first-rate equipment, yet small enough to assure our students of a close personal interaction with faculty. We recognize that our students are individuals, and our programs are structured so as to allow each student to reach his or her potential at an appropriate pace. The Department of Chemistry occupies two adjoining buildings – CBC and King Hall – that provide over 81,000 square feet of research, teaching and office space for the activities of our 21 faculty, 11 staff and 90 graduate students and research associates.

The Chemistry Department is well equipped with instrumentation to support modern chemical research. Major instrumentation includes a Varian  Inova 400-MHz and Mercury 400-MHz multinuclear NMR spectrometers, a liquid chromatogrpahy-mass spectrometry Waters Acquity UPLC-TQD system, two single crystal X-ray diffractometers (Siemens SMART 1000 and Bruker Kappa Apex II), and a low temperature-equipped Bruker powder X-ray diffractometer. Both the NMR and X-ray facilities are managed by full-time Ph.D. scientists.

The department houses extensive computational resources including two Beowulf clusters, and numerous and broad electrochemical research capabilities. Chemistry researchers have access to broad array of microscopy techniques, including AFM, STM, TEM, near-field scanning optical microscopy, multiphoton-excited fluorescence microscopy (with demonstrated single molecule capability), and ultrafast video microscopy.

The Chemistry Department possesses substantial instrumentation for the synthesis of nanoscale materials: chemical vapor deposition, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, electrochemical deposition and metal-vapor deposition methods are all available in faculty research groups. An extensive set of materials characterization methods are available within the department including surface plasmon resonance, ellipsometry, chemisorption and temperature-programmed desorption techniques, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and FT-IR/Raman/DRIFT spectra of gases, liquids and solids.

Apart from routine spectroscopic instrumentation, the department houses many custom-built systems for time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy, fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy, hole-burning spectroscopy, single-molecule spectroscopy and high-resolution FT spectroscopy.

The Department also has a well-stocked chemical storeroom, electronics and machine shops (staffed with full-time personnel), and a dedicated glass shop operated by a Senior Scientific Glassblower. Safety in our research and teaching laboratories is of paramount importance to us, and we are fortunate to have a full-time safety officer.

The Kansas State University Libraries provide excellent facilities and support for research in the chemical sciences. Apart from electronic access to a full spectrum of research journals, the libraries maintain an extensive collection of print holdings. The library also participates in an interlibrary loan service that provides rapid access to work that has been published in obscure journals. The department enjoys round-the-clock access to all the resources of SciFinder Scholar and other online databases.
Programs of study and group structure

Programs of study and group structure

The Department of Chemistry offers programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees specializing in analytical, biological, inorganic, materials, organic, and physical chemistry. The department faculty and research programs are operated through six overlapping “groups”. Each “group” has faculty and adjunct faculty who work together to coordinate a “group” graduate program involving graduate courses, seminar programs and a cumulative examination system.

Entering students are administered diagnostic exams in each of the traditional areas of chemistry (analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical) designed to assess their preparations for graduate studies. Outstanding students are encouraged to take advanced standing exams that allow certain required course work to be bypassed. A minimum grade of C must be obtained in all courses in order to earn credit and a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0 (out of a possible 4.0) is necessary. Original research is the most important part of the graduate program, and selection of a research director is made during the first semester in residence in order to allow students to start work on their research projects at an early date.

Financial support

Most graduate students are supported for the duration of their studies by various teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and fellowships. Incoming students are generally awarded teaching assistantships; summer support also is provided if performance in course work and teaching duties during the academic year is satisfactory. Students with excellent undergraduate credentials frequently receive supplemental departmental fellowships and are considered for graduate fellowships on a university-wide competitive basis. Outstanding graduate students are recognized annually through teaching and research awards.

 

Programs

Doctor of Philosophy

Master of Science

Courses

Chemistry